Pinar Selek: 15 years of State harassment

Pinar Selek is a feminist sociologist who has been imprisoned and harassed by the Turkish government for nearly fifteen years now on fabricated charges after Pinar wrote a thesis on the subject of the Kurds.

She is living in exile in France but the Turkish State is again trying to get her extradited: the last episode of a saga in which she is endlessly acquitted by a lower court and then re-condemned by a supreme court that over-rules the judgment.

More detailed information on her case can be read here.

Pinar Selek

The next Supreme Court appeal trial for Pinar Selek will be held on April 30, 2014. The International Spokesperson of Pinar Selek Solidarity Committee in Turkey is seeking for organizations and individuals willing to sign a statement in support of Pinar. If your or your organization would like to help, please contact Ms Yesim Basaran (yesim.tuba@gmail.com), Ms Karin Karakasli (karinkarakasli@yahoo.com) or Mr Onur Fidangul (ofidangul@iglhrc.org).

Advertisements

Kurdish women fight for equality in Syria

Like her five sisters before her, Ahin left school to help her mother at home. Now she’s training to fight.

Source: Reuters

At a remote Kurdish militia base on the grassy rolling hills near Syria’s border with Iraq, the stocky 19-year-old jumps and crawls with rows of women in olive green fatigues. Their commander barks an order, and they take position and aim their Kalashnikovs.

Kurdish female fighters of the Kurdish People's Protection Units (YPG) hold their weapons at a military training camp in Malikiya, Hassaka province December 9, 2013. Credit: REUTERS/Rodi Said

Kurdish female fighters of the Kurdish People’s Protection Units (YPG) hold their weapons at a military training camp in Malikiya, Hassaka province December 9, 2013. Credit: REUTERS/Rodi Said

Continue reading

Sebahat Tuncel on the Peace Process in Turkey

In early 2013, a critical process is unfolding regarding the solution to the Kurdish question in Turkey. The success of this process—that is, the protection of Kurdish people’s collective rights through the making of constitutional and legal amendments—is fundamental to ending the war which has been waged for thirty years in Turkey. These developments in Turkey are not independent from developments taking place in the rest of the Middle East.

Source: Jadaliyya

A historic process is unfolding regarding the Kurdish problem, which has been left unresolved for the last two hundred years in the Middle East. The Kurdish people, whose geography has been torn into four pieces, and who have been struggling against the oppressive politics of the states of Iran, Iraq, Syria, and Turkey, are very close to winning their struggle for freedom, equality, and democracy in the Middle East. The Kurdish people’s organized struggle in Rojava under the leadership of the Democratic Union Party (PYD) and their participation in the revolutionary process is an important practice from the perspective of the twenty-first century struggle for revolution and socialism. The Kurdish liberation movement has, for the first time, the opportunity to put the “democratic, ecological, gender liberationist” paradigm into practice.

Continue reading